Tag Archives: U.S. Tax Law

Ruling Demonstrates Potential for Inversion Rules to Apply in Inbound Structures

In Private Letter Ruling 201432002 (the “PLR”), the IRS ruled that a foreign-to-foreign “F” reorganization did not implicate the Section 7874 anti-inversion rules.  As a result, a foreign corporation (that was 100 percent foreign owned) was not deemed to be a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, despite the fact that it was … Continue Reading

IRS Denies Treaty Benefits Despite Lack of Treaty Shopping

In Starr International Company, Inc., v. United States, the taxpayer (“Starr International Company, Inc.” or “SICO”) filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia seeking a tax refund from the IRS of approximately $38 million.  The refund is allegedly due to an overpayment of U.S. withholding taxes on dividends … Continue Reading

Local Law Shopping Through “Derivative Benefits”

Unlike U.S. persons who are subject to U.S. federal income tax on their worldwide income, foreign persons generally are subject to U.S. taxation on two categories of income: (i) certain types of passive U.S.-source income (e.g., interest, dividends, royalties and other types of “fixed or determinable annual or periodical income,” collectively known as FDAP), which … Continue Reading

Check-the-Box Elections: Relevance in the International Context

One of the most powerful tools in cross-border tax planning is the ability to make a “check-the-box” election.  Pursuant to the entity classification regulations under Internal Revenue Code §7701 (the “check-the-box regulations”), certain business entities are permitted to choose their classification for U.S. federal income tax purposes by making a check-the-box election. The Federal tax … Continue Reading
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